Market Report – March 2018 eBay Auctions

Hello art lovers, today we’ll go through some completed eBay auctions from March 2018!

 

strange-tales-4-1987

Strange Tales #4 (1987), cover by Kevin Nowlan – $4,592

A couple of Nowlan Strange Tales covers sold for around $3k during the past 3 years, making this #4 one look particularly pricey. Although, none of those other pieces contained standalone images of Cloak & Dagger as large or striking as this cover’s.

Kevin’s long been a highly-regarded artist and prices of his works are starting to reflect that, as collectors increasingly value his peak-period output from the ‘80s. June 2018’s Cloak & Dagger TV show may have also played a part in drumming up enthusiasm for these two characters.

 

x-factor-annual-3-1988-page-51-by-paris-cullins-tony-dezuniga

X-Factor Annual #3 (1988), page 51 by Paris Cullins & Tony DeZuniga – $192

As readers of this column may have noticed, I have a penchant for powerful, distinctive-looking characters who some may term as ‘villains’ due to their alternative outlooks from the standard ‘heroes’. The High Evolutionary falls into this category, and appears to have suffered some discrimination for that, as sub-$200 for a zany 30 year-old title-page splash seems criminally cheap!

 

x-men-alpha-flight-1-1998-page-21-by-john-cassaday

X-Men/Alpha Flight #1 (1998), page 21 by John Cassaday – $490

Cassaday’s a modern comics star, and values of his artwork tend to reflect that. X-Men remains one of his prized subject-matter, so under $500 for this half-page splash with large, costumed images of the team’s big guns in dynamic poses (including a “claws-out” Wolvie) is an astonishing deal!

 

uncanny-x-men-360-1998-page-35-by-chris-bachalo-peter-palmiotti

Uncanny X-Men #360 (1998), page 35 by Chris Bachalo & Peter Palmiotti – $295

Here’s one of Chris’ hallmark creatively laid out pages, putting Storm’s powers on full display and stuffing its panels with multiple mutants. Continuing the trend of reasonably-priced Bachalo Marvel OA, $295 is an eminently fair sum for this character-laden page from the flagship Uncanny X-Men title. Collectors should definitely be looking to pick up such pieces while they remain at current price levels.

 

jungle-action-7-1973-page-17-by-rich-buckler-klaus-janson

Jungle Action #7 (1973), page 17 by Rich Buckler & Klaus Janson – $2,651

$2.7k is an impressive amount for a Jungle Action panel page, even one featuring Black Panther, considering that you used to be able to get the covers with T’Challa in action for only 2-3x the price. This is the first instance I’m aware of that a Black Panther OA sale has benefitted from a movie bump. Also, you’d be hard-pressed to find another page with more images of the Wakandan hero packed into it!

 

thanos-4-2004-page-16-by-jim-starlin-al-milgrom

Thanos #4 (2004), page 16 by Jim Starlin & Al Milgrom – $680

Given the heights that Starlin’s Marvel Cosmic artwork has climbed to, this circa-$700 eBay Buy It Now purchase is in line with sales of his other Thanos-related works from the early-‘00s. There isn’t much of the Mad Titan here (that menacing stare-down aside), but detailed Warlock fight scenes (and Pip popping up in panel one) make up for it.

 

silver-surfer-32-1989-page-9-by-ron-frenz-joe-sinnott

Silver Surfer #32 (1989), page 9 by Ron Frenz & Joe Sinnott – $305

SS #32 falls smack-dab in the middle of Ron Lim’s seminal Surfer run, with rollicking Ron Frenz performing stand-in penciling duties for this issue. $300 is good value for money, given that Frenz Thor panel pages from the same period go for at least 30% more, and Lim SS ones start at around $600. Moreover, this page’s Surfer is distinctly Kirby-esque, thanks to Sinnott channeling the same look as when he worked with Jack on the character!

 

doomsday-clock-1-2018-page-23-by-gary-frank

Doomsday Clock #1 (2018), page 23 by Gary Frank – $1,225

As noted in my Q4 2017 eBay Market Report, Frank’s star is back on the rise, with assignments to high profile titles such as Doomsday Clock. At the time, I didn’t anticipate how big a hit this series would be, nor how much the Watchmen and Gary’s art still resonate with readers. $1.2k+ for a panel page so new that the ink’s still dripping wet is mightily impressive – justified by that large full-figure Ozymandias shot, nu-Rorschach panels and appearances of the absolutely adorable baby Bubastis!

 

warlord-of-mars-dejah-thoris-4-2011-cover-b-by-joe-jusko

Warlord of Mars: Dejah Thoris #4 (2011), cover B by Joe Jusko – $6,900

Nearly $7k for a relatively new cover of this slightly obscure heroine is a very robust figure, even if it was rendered by the legendary Jusko. It’s pretty obvious that Dejah has what it takes to attract bidders, and the painting’s large size (15”x23”) probably helped out too.

 

angelic-page-2018-by-chris-rahn

Angelic Page (2018) by Chris Rahn – $3,383; 20”x16”

$3.4k seems about right for this ephemeral reinterpretation of a recognizable creature from Magic: The Gathering’s past, taking into account it’s also collector-friendly angel art from the Masters 25 anniversary set. The oil painting on wooden board by superstar Rahn measures 20”x16”, which can be considered mid-sized for his artwork. Chris tends to produce pieces showcasing notable but generic creatures at around this size, and those starring main character Planeswalkers at larger sizes.

 

uktabi-wildcats-2001-by-thomas-gianni

Uktabi Wildcats (2001) by Thomas Gianni – $1,200; 9.25”x9”

Hailing from the 7th Edition set (which incidentally is when I started playing M:TG), the above Uktabi Wildcats (love the name) sold for exactly as expected. When viewed at its published playing card size, it’s hard to appreciate the haunting yet visceral beauty of this wildlife scene – once again highlighting a benefit of collecting original (M:TG and comic book) artwork!

Until next time, happy collecting!

 

Here’s Part 1 & Part 2 of the guide to collecting original comic art; and my CAF gallery.

 

Original Art Aficionado archive

 

12 comments

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.